Wednesday 21st October 2020
Car Enthusiast - click here to access the home page

 


BMW boots up 3 Series Touring Mk6. Image by BMW.

BMW boots up 3 Series Touring Mk6
<< earlier BMW article     later BMW article >>

 


News homepage -> BMW news

Newer articles featuring 2020 BMW 3 Series

2020-02-19: BMW sparks with Geneva show stars
2019-07-28: First drive: BMW 330d xDrive Touring

What's all this about?

It's our first look at the sixth-generation BMW 3 Series Touring. And no, we've not lost the plot; the original E21 3 Series of the 1970s and early 1980s never had a wagon variant, so while there have been seven generations of the Three - culminating in the G20 3 Series Saloon, upon which this new Touring is based - there have only been six estate variants in that time.

Fascinating, but can we get back to business?

Fair enough. As ever in the modern car world, the new Touring is bigger and better - says its maker - than the old Touring. Physically, the first part of this claim is indubitably true: it's 76mm longer, 16mm wider, 8mm taller, has a 41mm longer wheelbase and front and rear tracks that are 43- and 21mm broader, respectively. All this means more space on board for humans (more shoulder-, elbow-, leg- and headroom is promised, as is the ability for the rear bench to take three child seats across its form) and also cargo, in a boot that stands at 500 litres with all five chairs in action and 1,510 litres with the 40:20:40 split rear backrest folded down. These are increases of a mere five and ten litres over its predecessor, but - usefully - the new Three Touring has a boot aperture that's 125mm wider than before, leading onto a load bed that's up to 112mm wider in places. Even the rear screen is wider by 20mm... and yes, like any BMW Touring since the dawn of time, the glass opens separately to the hatch.

Is that all on the physical form?

Absolutely not, although we'll skip much of the exterior aesthetics and interior layout, for these reasons: one, the bodywork is a G20 Three with a nicer rear end, as is always the way because Tourings trump Saloons in the BMW beauty stakes; and two, the dashboard layout and the tech that's on offer - both in terms of comfort and safety - is the same as the four-door Threes. So what we'll touch on are a few visual points, which are the upswept shoulder line behind the C-pillar that forms the Hofmeister kink (this raked glass being new to the Three Touring), the fully LED light clusters all round and the more aerodynamic bodywork, which slips through the air with a 0.27Cd rating, compared to the outgoing model's best of 0.29Cd. Perhaps more pertinently, the Touring's shell has at least 25 per cent more torsional rigidity than the old model and is, in places, up to half as resistant to twist again as its predecessor. This will help all manner of things: handling sharpness, ride comfort and rolling refinement, namely. Oh, and the weight balance? Why, it's 50:50, front-to-rear. What else were you expecting of BMW?

Very good. What about motive power?

Six models from launch, which are the 320i, 330i and M340i for petrol power, and then the 318d, 320d and 330d for the diesels. Only the biggest of each fuel type can claim inline-six honours; the rest are all four-cylinder turbo units. Power ranges from 184- to 374hp on the petrol engines, and 150- to 265hp for the diesels, with gearboxes being either a six-speed manual or the much-more-common eight-speed Steptronic auto. Most of the launch models are rear-driven, but both the M340i (which also has 500Nm of torque) and the 330d come with xDrive all-wheel drive as standard, while both the 320d and 330i can be optioned up with it if needs be. Expect fuel economy between 65.7mpg (320d) and 39.8mpg (M340i), with the lowest CO2 emissions per model ranging from 114g/km up to 162g/km. Almost all of them will hit an electronic speed limiter at 155mph, the exceptions being the 320i/320d (both 143mph) and the 318d (133mph), while 0-62mph takes as much as 8.9 seconds in a manual 318d and as little as a scorching 4.5 seconds in the M340i. BMW has also confirmed the Three Touring will have the cornering abilities to match its straight-line power, as all of M Sport suspension with a lower ride height, Adaptive M suspension, variable Sport steering, M Sport brakes and an electronically controlled M Sport differential with fully variable locking function will be available to purchasers.

Sounds good. Is that it for the 2019 launch models?

It is indeed, but we already have confirmation of a plug-in hybrid 3 Series Touring, due in for summer 2020. As yet, we don't know if this will be a four-cylinder drivetrain, as employed in the old 330e, or the new six-pot part-electric gubbins, which is finding its way into current BMW PHEVs like the 745e.

Anything else to add?

Yes, one final thing. In the UK, we get our own high-spec version of the 3 Series Touring, called M Sport Plus Edition. It sits above the usual trim hierarchy of SE, Sport and then M Sport, and bundles in some desirable extra kit and options. Such as, there are two solid and nine metallic colour choices elsewhere in the range, but there are three exclusive paints for the M Sport Plus Edition cars: Dravit Grey, Tanzanite Blue and Oxide Grey. The cabin is enhanced with Aluminium Fabric high-gloss trim inserts, while it will come with sun-protect glazing, Adaptive M Sport suspension, Extended BMW individual High-Gloss Shadow Line exterior trim, M Seat Belts (snazzy!), the M Sport Braking system (on the 320d variants) and the M Sport Differential (on the 330i and 330d models). Buyers will also get black door mirror caps and exclusive Jet Black 19-inch M light double-spoke alloys, and M Sport Plus Edition spec is available on every Touring going bar the range-topping M340i. First customer deliveries of any variant of the Three wagon will begin in the UK at the end of September.



Matt Robinson - 11 Jun 2019


2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.

2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.2020 BMW 3 Series Touring. Image by BMW.









www.bmw.co.uk    - BMW road tests
- BMW news
- 3 Series images






BMW targets Golf GTI with 128ti. Image by BMW AG.
BMW reveals GTI-challenging 128ti
BMW’s ti badge makes a comeback after a lengthy hiatus on a FWD, 265hp 1 Series.
 
BMW unveils 4 Series Convertible. Image by BMW AG.
New BMW 4 Series soft-top revealed
Soft-top roof and 374hp M440i range-topper for new Four Convertible. Just don’t mention its face…
BMW updates G30 and G31 5 Series. Image by BMW AG.
BMW 5 Series G30 and G31 LCI
Marked visual update see BMW 5 Series Mk7 looking more like current 3 Series; five PHEVs announced, too.

 
 215 Racing
 9ff
 A. Kahn Design
 Abarth
 Abt
 AC Cars
 AC Schnitzer
 Acura
 Alfa Romeo
 Alpina
 Alpine
 Amari
 APS Sportec
 Arash
 Arden
 Ares
 Ariel
 Arrinera
 Artega
 Ascari
 Aston Martin
 Atalanta
 Atomik
 Audi
 Austin
 Auto Union
 Autodelta
 Autofarm
 Autosport
 Avatar
 Axon
 Aznom
 BAC
 BAIC
 Bentley
 Bertone
 Bloodhound
 Bluebird
 BMW
 Bosch
 Bowler
 Brabham
 Brabus
 Breckland
 Bridgestone
 Brilliance
 Bristol
 Bugatti
 Buick
 Burton
 BYD
 Cadillac
 Callaway
 Caparo
 Capstone
 Carlsson
 Caterham
 CCG
 Chang'an
 Changfeng
 Chevrolet
 Chevron
 Chongfeng
 Chrysler
 Citroen
 Climax
 Connaught
 Cooper Tires
 Corvette
 Cummins
 Cupra
 Dacia
 Daewoo
 Daihatsu
 Daimler
 Dartz
 Datsun
 David Brown
 David Brown Automotive
 DDR
 De Tomaso
 Delta
 Detroit Electric
 Devon
 Dodge
 Donkervoort
 Drayson
 DS
 Eagle
 Eagle E-type
 EDAG
 edo competition
 Eterniti
 Evisol
 Exagon
 FAB Design

 
 Factory Five
 Faralli & Mazzanti
 Fenix
 Fenomenon
 Ferrari
 Fiat
 Fisker
 Ford
 G-Power
 Geely
 Gemballa
 General Motors
 Ginetta
 Giugiaro
 Glickenhaus
 GMC
 Goodwood
 Google
 Gordon Murray
 Gordon Murray Design
 Gray Design
 Great Wall
 GTA
 GTM
 Gumpert
 Hamann
 Hartge
 HBH
 Heffner Performance
 Hennessey
 HERE
 Holden
 Honda
 Hulme
 Hummer
 Hyundai
 I.D.E.A
 Icona
 IFR
 Infiniti
 Ionity
 Isis
 JAC
 Jaguar
 Jeep
 Jensen
 Jetstream
 JJAD
 Joss Developments
 Kahn
 Kamala
 Keating
 Kia
 Koenigsegg
 KTM
 Kumho
 Lada
 Lagonda
 Lamborghini
 Lancia
 Land Rover
 Lexus
 Liberty
 Lightning
 Lincoln
 Lister
 Loma Performance
 Lorinser
 Lotus
 LupiniPower
 Luxgen
 Mahindra
 Mansory
 Maserati
 Mastretta
 Maybach
 Mazda
 McLaren
 Mercedes
 Mercedes-AMG
 Mercedes-Benz
 Mercedes-Maybach
 Mercury
 Metrocab
 MG
 Michelin
 MINI
 Mitsubishi
 MMI
 Monte Carlo
 Mopar
 Morgan
 Mosler
 MTM
 NAC MG
 Nissan

 
 NLV
 Noble
 Novitec
 Opel
 Overfinch
 Pagani
 Perodua
 Peugeot
 Piaggio
 Pininfarina
 Polestar
 Pontiac
 Porsche
 Preview
 Prodrive
 Project Runningblade
 Project Velocity
 Proton
 Protoscar
 Qoros
 Radical
 Red Bull
 Renault
 Reva
 Rimac
 Rinspeed
 RoadRazer
 Rolls-Royce
 Ronn Motor Company
 Rover
 RUF
 Saab
 SAIC
 Saleen
 Saturn
 Scagliarini
 SCG
 Scion
 SDR Sportscars
 SEAT
 Sin
 Singer
 Skoda
 Smart
 Soleil
 Spada
 speedArt
 Sportec
 Spyker
 SRT
 Ssangyong
 SSC
 Startech
 STaSIS
 Subaru
 Suzuki
 Suzusho
 TAD
 Tamiya
 Tata
 Techart
 Tesla
 THINK
 Thunder Power
 Tojeiro
 Tommy Kaira
 TomTom
 Toray
 Toyota
 Trabant
 TranStar
 Trident
 Tushek
 TVR
 UKCOTY
 Vanda Electrics
 Vauxhall
 Velozzi
 Vencer
 Venturi
 Veritas
 Vizualtech
 VL Automotive
 Volkswagen
 Volvo
 VUHL
 Webasto
 Westfield
 Wiesmann
 Xenatec
 Yamaha
 Zagato
 Zarooq
 Zenos
 Zenvo



 
 






External links:   | Irish Car Market News |

Internal links:   | Home | Privacy | Contact us | Archives | Follow Car Enthusiast on Twitter | Copyright 1999-2020 ©