Wednesday 25th May 2022
Car Enthusiast - click here to access the home page

 


New Range Rover gets smarter and more luxurious. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.

New Range Rover gets smarter and more luxurious
The new Range Rover is packed with clever design and engineering together with more luxury than most of us will ever need.
<< earlier Land Rover article     later Land Rover article >>

 


News homepage -> Land Rover news

What's all this about?

The Range Rover has been with us for over fifty years and now feels deserving of a peerage. For the last five years, Land Rover has been developing the L460, the fifth generation, which has now been officially unveiled after pictures were previously leaked. We saw the SUV in the metal a few weeks ago and caught up with the heads of design and engineering to get the insight into what's gone into the new model.

The latest generation is clearly an evolution in the design of the L405 that debuted in 2012. Massimo Frascella, design director for Jaguar Land Rover (JLR), told us that while it's important to stay true to the original DNA of the Range Rover, it's equally important to always stay relevant and he feels he and his team have achieved this through four key elements: modernism, integrity, purpose and desirability.

The latter is a key point of discussion because while the Range Rover has set a standard for luxurious SUVs for fifty years, one of the things that has made it so popular is its Land Rover capability. Today Frascella says that people are not as interested in what it is capable of, instead they see it and they just have to have it. We wonder what engineering say about that.

Let's have a talk with design and engineering then.

To increase the desirability factory, the design has been tweaked, with the side graphic behind the front wheel arches now flatter and more artistic. The yacht line that rises up from the sill remains but many of the design lines have either been removed or toned down as part of the reductionist strategy that is happening across design in JLR. This includes the "hidden waist": says exterior designer Rob Battams, where the edges between the doors and the windows are almost imperceptible. That's not quite true of the shut lines for the clamshell bonnet, but he says they have been significantly reduced to give a cleaner look.

There's lots of familiarity in the overall design with some subtle tweaks across models, such as the different grille on the SV Serenity and Intrepid versions. The biggest changes are at the rear with the prominent black arch that Frascella told us is inspired by the Apple iPhone screen. Where are the lights then you ask? Surely Police Interceptors will be pulling Range Rover owners over everywhere? Well no, because the lights feature some of the more than 125 patents that were required for the technology in the new model. They feature LED bulbs that face into the car where their light shines onto mirrors that then magnify the light so it shoots out with enough intensity to penetrate the dark plastic. They meet all global lighting regulations and not only that, if the hazard lights are on and the tailgate is open there are duplicates in the bumper.

Creating these lights was "wickedly cool fun," according to the director of engineering at JLR, Nick Rogers. He's a firm believer in the same ideology of Charles Spencer-King, who created the first Range Rover, that "an engineer should do whatever it takes". He does and so does his team, from the first plans and virtual reality simulations to managing over 1,000,000km of real-world testing.

They've created new bodywork made from 80 per cent aluminium with 50 per cent more torsional rigidity. It's also said to produce 24 per cent less structural noise, part of what Rogers calls the aim to create a "tranquil sanctuary" in the cabin. That's further enhanced by a noise cancelling system that can respond to external noise in a fraction of a second. It still won't be able to keep the kids quiet though.

That brings us to the luxury and technology of the interior

The Range Rover will be available with seven seats for the first time in its history, although only in the long wheelbase version. Technically you could say nine seats because there's the option of Tailgate Event seating for two when the boot is open. If you want to go full business class then you can opt for the Signature Suite which has two reclining rear seats either side of a full length centre console. It not only contains a fridge and a controls tablet, but an exquisitely crafted wood and metal table that rises out of the console as though making a grand operatic entrance.

It's all part of an interior that features new materials, including sustainable and recyclable ones, the ability to have different colours front and rear to further differentiate each section and more of that reductionist philosophy. This means a cleaner dashboard with a single line along the top and less buttons, although fortunately the essentials remain. There's a 13.1-inch touchscreen containing the Pivi Pro infotainment system from the new Defender and that now incorporates Amazon's Alexa. A nice luxury touch is the availability of ceramic on SV models for items like the gearstick and badging, something that looks and feels a lot better than the Swarovski crystal in a BMW.

All this design and luxury is great, but what about that capability?

Well, there are 34.7 and 29-degree approach and departure angles respectively. It has 295mm of ground clearance and the air suspension can rise up to 145mm. The wading depth is 900mm and it has a 48v electric anti-roll system to try and stop everyone shaking around too much while off-roading and to keep things flat if enjoying a dynamic drive on-road.

Talking of on-road, let's talk engines and here there's big news and then even bigger news. First up, the new plug-in hybrid petrol electric vehicle (PHEV). Before EVangelists get on our case, yes this doesn't make it an EV but a full battery-electric version will be along in 2024. For now though, a PHEV is a great transitional option for those who need the best of both worlds. In the Range Rover they get it too because despite its weight it has a 62 mile electric-only range which beats anything from rivals like the Bentley Bentayga and Porsche Cayenne.

Then there's the V8 and if you're expecting the usual 5.0-litre supercharged from JLR then you'll be wrong because the long-rumoured switch to BMW power has finally happened. Yes, the Range Rover gets the BMW N63 4.4-litre TwinPower Turbo which has been extensively re-worked in a joint deal between BMW and JLR and produces 530hp and 750Nm. Expect to see it in other models soon.

Beyond the headline news on the engines, there will also be mild-hybrid petrol and diesels.

Right, so what's it all going to cost?

The new Range Rover will be available in the UK from Spring 2022 with prices starting at £94,400 for the D300 diesel. That's for an entry-level SE spec version but then there is HSE, Autobiography and First Edition. You can also go into JLR Special Vehicle Operations territory with the SV Serenity and SV Intrepid versions, the former being all about elegant luxury, the latter a darker and sportier looking thing. If you still want more then you'll be wanting to go full-on bespoke and it's almost the sky's the limit.

If you're wondering about the next generation of the Range Rover Sport, there's not much we can tell you about that, except that it is codenamed L461 and it should be along shortly, if that helps. It probably doesn't.

There might be a small difference of opinion between the design and engineering teams as to what makes someone want a Range Rover, but they both agree that they have worked closer than ever before on the new one. There's lots to like about it and a few points to discuss, but like the previous four generations, it's easy to imagine that it will once again be lord of the SUV manor.



Mark Smyth - 26 Oct 2021


2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.

2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.2021 Range Rover. Image by Land Rover/Nick Dimbleby.









www.landrover.co.uk    - Land Rover road tests
- Land Rover news
- Range Rover images






New Range Rover Sport makes big dam debut. Image by Land Rover.
2022 Range Rover Sport
The new Range Rover Sport has been unveiled with a new look, new architecture and an all-electric version arriving in 2024.
 
Classic Range Rover for modern lifestyles. Image by Kingsley Cars.
Old school is cool
The new Range Rover is coming, but what about an old Range Rover with new stuff? Thatís the idea behind the Kingsley Reborn Range Rover, plus itís low emission zone compliant.
Land Rover Hard Top returns. Image by Land Rover.
Land Rover Defender Hard Top CV announced
New Land Rover Defenderís commercial versions will be the 90 and 110 Hard Top models.

 
 215 Racing
 9ff
 A. Kahn Design
 Abarth
 Abt
 AC Cars
 AC Schnitzer
 Acura
 Alfa Romeo
 Alpina
 Alpine
 Amari
 APS Sportec
 Arash
 Arden
 Ares
 Ariel
 Arrinera
 Artega
 Ascari
 Aston Martin
 Atalanta
 Atomik
 Audi
 Austin
 Auto Union
 Autodelta
 Autofarm
 Autosport
 AVA
 Avatar
 Axon
 Aznom
 BAC
 BAIC
 Bentley
 Bertone
 Bloodhound
 Bluebird
 BMW
 Bosch
 Bowler
 Brabham
 Brabus
 Breckland
 Bridgestone
 Brilliance
 Bristol
 Bugatti
 Buick
 Burton
 BYD
 Cadillac
 Callaway
 Caparo
 Capstone
 Carlsson
 Caterham
 CCG
 Chang'an
 Changfeng
 Chevrolet
 Chevron
 Chongfeng
 Chrysler
 Citroen
 Climax
 Connaught
 Cooper Tires
 Corvette
 Cummins
 Cupra
 Dacia
 Daewoo
 Daihatsu
 Daimler
 Dartz
 Datsun
 David Brown
 David Brown Automotive
 DDR
 De Tomaso
 Delta
 Detroit Electric
 Devon
 Dodge
 Donkervoort
 Drayson
 DS
 Eagle
 Eagle E-type
 EDAG
 edo competition
 Eterniti
 Evisol
 Exagon
 FAB Design

 
 Factory Five
 Faralli & Mazzanti
 Fenix
 Fenomenon
 Ferrari
 Fiat
 Fisker
 Ford
 G-Power
 Geely
 Gemballa
 General Motors
 Ginetta
 Giugiaro
 Glickenhaus
 GMC
 Goodwood
 Google
 Gordon Murray
 Gordon Murray Design
 Gray Design
 Great Wall
 GTA
 GTM
 Gumpert
 Hamann
 Hartge
 HBH
 Heffner Performance
 Hennessey
 HERE
 Holden
 Honda
 Hulme
 Hummer
 Hyundai
 I.D.E.A
 Icona
 IFR
 Infiniti
 Ionity
 Isis
 JAC
 Jaguar
 Jeep
 Jensen
 Jetstream
 JJAD
 Joss Developments
 Kahn
 Kamala
 Keating
 Kia
 Koenigsegg
 KTM
 Kumho
 Lada
 Lagonda
 Lamborghini
 Lancia
 Land Rover
 Lexus
 Liberty
 Lightning
 Lincoln
 Lister
 Loma Performance
 Lorinser
 Lotus
 LupiniPower
 Luxgen
 Mahindra
 Mansory
 Maserati
 Mastretta
 Maybach
 Mazda
 McLaren
 Mercedes
 Mercedes-AMG
 Mercedes-Benz
 Mercedes-Maybach
 Mercury
 Metrocab
 MG
 Michelin
 MINI
 Mitsubishi
 MMI
 Monte Carlo
 Mopar
 Morgan
 Mosler
 MTM
 NAC MG
 Nissan
 NLV

 
 Noble
 Novitec
 Opel
 Overfinch
 Pagani
 Perodua
 Peugeot
 Piaggio
 Pininfarina
 Polestar
 Pontiac
 Porsche
 Preview
 Prodrive
 Project Runningblade
 Project Velocity
 Proton
 Protoscar
 Qoros
 Radical
 Range Rover
 Red Bull
 Renault
 Reva
 Rimac
 Rinspeed
 RoadRazer
 Rolls-Royce
 Ronn Motor Company
 Rover
 RUF
 Saab
 SAIC
 Saleen
 Saturn
 Scagliarini
 SCG
 Scion
 SDR Sportscars
 SEAT
 Sin
 Singer
 Skoda
 Smart
 Soleil
 Spada
 speedArt
 Sportec
 Spyker
 SRT
 Ssangyong
 SSC
 Startech
 STaSIS
 Subaru
 Suzuki
 Suzusho
 TAD
 Tamiya
 Tata
 Techart
 Tesla
 THINK
 Thunder Power
 Tojeiro
 Tommy Kaira
 TomTom
 Toray
 Toyota
 Trabant
 TranStar
 Trident
 Tushek
 TVR
 UKCOTY
 Vanda Electrics
 Vauxhall
 Velozzi
 Vencer
 Venturi
 Veritas
 Vizualtech
 VL Automotive
 Volkswagen
 Volvo
 VUHL
 Webasto
 Westfield
 Wiesmann
 Xenatec
 Yamaha
 Zagato
 Zarooq
 Zenos
 Zenvo



 
 






External links:   | Irish Car Market News |

Internal links:   | Home | Privacy | Contact us | Archives | Follow Car Enthusiast on Twitter | Copyright 1999-2022 ©